Learning how to communicate about your research with other societal partners is a key skill although, as we explain elsewhere in this toolkit, transdisciplinary research adopts a co-creation approach that goes much further than simply conveying research findings to potential end users. 

Resources
Co-create research impact
link-icon

In this blog, Mark Reed draws on his own research to distill five principles for achieving societal impact.

link-icon

The Societal Impact toolkit includes advice and insights from researcher interviews, as well as further reading resources, methods and evaluation tools to help you find out more about societal impact and how to create it for your own research.

document-icon

One of the key aims of the ACCOMPLISH project is to foster dialogue between researchers and relevant stakeholders in order to increase the impact of Social Science and Humanities research. This report summarises practical principles and steps that universities can adopt in order to enable and encourage co-creation for impact.

link-icon

The Arts + Social Impact Explorer is another interactive, visual tool intended to promote deeper understanding of the arts’ long-term social impact by drawing together research in an effort to make more visible the wide-reaching impact of the arts.

document-icon

The Trinity Long Room Hub’s Interdisciplinarity for Impact Workshop Report summarises a set of recommendations for a number of different stakeholders to help better foster and support IDR at a national level.

document-icon

In this discussion paper, the HIBAR Research Alliance (HRA) brings together contributors from research universities and related organizations, with a goal of catalysing societally relevant research which they describe as “Highly Integrative Basic and Responsive (HIBAR)”.

Understand research-policy interactions
link-icon

One of the core tenets of transdisciplinary research is its relevance to society. In this open access article, Christian Pohl and colleagues offer a 10-step step guide to stimulating explicit reflections around ways to render research more societally relevant.

 

link-icon

In this blog, policy scholars, Kat Smith and Paul Cairney, reflect on what they feel are some of the key insights about the interplay between evidence and policy.

document-icon

This guide for facilitators and funders of research policy exchange programmes translates lessons learned from the 2020 Energy-SHIFTS Policy Fellowships into five principal questions.

link-icon

As part of its training programme, the Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center has produced a series of workbooks targeted to researchers wishing to communicate research findings to policymakers. Although written for PhD students in the life sciences, there are valuable general lessons for others working at the research-policy interface.

link-icon

This Nature article discusses the EC Joint Research Centre’s work on knowledge management. The authors outline eight key practices to improve the use of research in policy.

link-icon

‘Evidence synthesis’ refers to the process of bringing together information from a range of sources and disciplines to inform debates and decisions on specific issues. The UK’s Academy of Medical Sciences and Royal Society have produced a report on the topic and a set of set of principles for best practice in evidence synthesis.

link-icon

This guide to getting evidence into parliament – co-authored by the UK’s Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST) – includes a useful infographic.

link-icon

The EC has produced an open access book  Communicating Research for Evidence-Based Policymaking, a practical guide to supporting cooperation between researchers and policymakers that is aimed at social scientists and humanities researchers.

link-icon

This open access article analyses how knowledge transfer between academy, public administration and society can be used to improve public policy.

document-icon

SHAPE-ID partner Catherine Lyall provides her Top Ten Tips for working with policymakers.

Learn how to communicate with different audiences

Many research performing organisations will offer staff training in how to communicate with wider audiences which might also cover media training.  Key skills for transdisciplinary researchers who wish to communicate with other societal partners include learning how to write a policy brief.

link-icon

Here we include two guides, one from a government policy perspective.

link-icon

And the other from a civil society organisation.

link-icon

The UK Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology (POST) has also collaborated on the production on this how-to guide to getting your research into Parliament.

link-icon

The European Commission has produced a practical guide for researchers in socio-economic sciences and humanities on communicating research for evidence-based policymaking.

link-icon

In this article, linked to an online course, Tobias Buser explains why project partners are important when it comes to widening the scope of communication and impact.

link-icon

The AAAS Communication Toolkit provides guidance for “scientists” to build skills to more effectively communicate and engage with public audiences – don’t be put off by the term “scientists”, there are some good communication fundamentals here.

The EU Guide to Science Communication covers similar communication basics in video form.

As part of the Guide to Science Communication, the EU also produced these 9 short videos on  topics such as Engage your audience  or Working with museums.

link-icon

This website from a UK research funder provides many resources designed to support knowledge exchange including a guide on how to write a press release.

document-icon

The Wellcome Trust offers a short step by step guide to planning public engagement activities.

link-icon

Mark Reed’s Fast Track Impact website provides a range of resources and training including a series of audio clips on techniques for influencing policy.

link-icon

And a Media Impact Guide and Toolkit.

link-icon

Another form of communication takes place between those who speak and work in different languages. This blog post discusses the importance of multilingualism for transdisciplinary research.

Acknowledge contributions in outputs

Different communities and different disciplines will vary in what they consider to be best practice in acknowledging joint contributions to project outputs.  This is something that should be considered and discussed at the start of collaborative projects in order to avoid misunderstandings.  Some organisations have developed guidance on this in order to facilitate collaboration and reduce disputes.  While these were derived from an academic publishing perspective, the documents here may also provide the basis for discussions among broader groups of knowledge co-producers

 

link-icon

Useful guidance on author contributions to academic papers are offered by the CRediT (Contributor Roles Taxonomy) author statement following a collaborative workshop led by Harvard University and the Wellcome Trust, with input from researchers, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) and publishers.

link-icon

The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors offers further guidance on defining the role of authors and contributors.

document-icon

This good practice charter from the Artists’ Union includes some tips on paying artists for networking and skills sharing.

Publication and Open Access

Different disciplines follow different routes to dissemination.  In the natural sciences the academic article in Nature is still the gold standard; elsewhere “dissemination” might take an entirely different form such as an exhibition or performance.  One major disruptor in recent years has been the move towards open access publication and “Plan S” which have asymmetrical impacts on scholars from different disciplinary traditions.  The Coalition-S website provides further information.  Research performing organisations and research funders may issue their own guidance on open access requirements.  This is an important issue that collaborators should discuss when planning a publications strategy for any inter- or transdisciplinary projects.

link-icon

A range of views are presented on this topic on the London School of Economics blog including this summary of key themes.

link-icon

The British Academy has provided comments on the Plan S proposal from the perspective of the arts and humanities.

link-icon

A key element of getting academic work published is identifying the right journal to submit it to. The i2S website provides a comprehensive list of ID and TD friendly journals.

document-icon

SHAPE-ID have produced a guide to OPERAS, a European Research Infrastructure for the development of open scholarly communication in the social sciences and humanities.

document-icon

And a guide to Open Science and the art humanities and social sciences.